Welcome Guest! To enable all features please try to register or login.
2 Pages<12
Options
View
Go to last post Go to first unread
Offline Bill Teeter  
#16 Posted : Friday, December 1, 2017 2:06:38 PM(UTC)
Bill  Teeter

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 150
Canada

Thanks: 15 times
Was thanked: 63 time(s) in 35 post(s)
Hopefully Greg you are seeing that IMAC can be really whatever you want it to be. If you want to be a Regional, National or World Champion, it has that potential You have to dedicate yourself to practice and burning a lot of gas or electrons and may or may not ever get there.

Or you can just be satisfied that you are improving your skills and becoming a better pilot that you were last year. I always ask myself if I developed any skills this year that have nudged my flying forward. So far I can say that I think I have improved incrementally each year for the past 11 years. I do accept that I am pretty much at my own plateau but I am fine with that.

As Steve said, it is a family or community of common interest. After a while contests become a little like family reunions. I accepted long ago that I will never be an Unlimited pilot. Many days I feel like I am already two levels above my comfort level, but I keep reminding myself that I do this for fun and that is what I really try to focus on. Pushing myself to improve is also something I enjoy. But not to the point of making myself unhappy because someone else beat me. In this discipline on any weekend a 14 year old can beat me !

One thing that for is that you can learn a lot from the other pilots. My knowledge of how to set up a plane and make the radio work for you has come largely because of knowledge I gained from more experienced IMAC pilots. That learning has also contributed to my enjoyment of the hobby. Things I have learned in IMAC I share every time I am out at my home club helping other guys learn to fly and fly well.

I also had the privilege of flying for Team Canada at the Worlds in 2014. That in itself was an incredible experience. I cannot think of any other sport or hobby that would ever allow me to be part of a World competition. The thought that you could participate in something and represent your country was an experience I doubt I will ever have again.

Bottom line is make it what you want it to be. For me the competition side has decreased a bit and the fun and friendship is really why I go to the contests. After all, if I really just want to fly I can get more flying done in 2 hours at my home field. But I really enjoy my IMAC friends and that keeps me going through a lot of cold winters !
thanks 5 users thanked Bill Teeter for this useful post.
rclad on 12/1/2017(UTC), Joe Layne on 12/1/2017(UTC), Doug Pilcher on 12/1/2017(UTC), Earle Andrews on 12/1/2017(UTC), Jim7216 on 12/2/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#17 Posted : Friday, December 1, 2017 2:31:21 PM(UTC)
rclad

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 153
United States

Thanks: 87 times
Was thanked: 36 time(s) in 24 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Bill Teeter Go to Quoted Post
I also had the privilege of flying for Team Canada at the Worlds in 2014. That in itself was an incredible experience. I cannot think of any other sport or hobby that would ever allow me to be part of a World competition. The thought that you could participate in something and represent your country was an experience I doubt I will ever have again.


That's an awesome accomplishment, Bill! Thanks for all that you've done for IMAC. I always appreciate your insight on this forum. Glad you're still having fun with this sport.

Originally Posted by: Bill Teeter Go to Quoted Post
In this discipline on any weekend a 14 year old can beat me!


Laugh I'm still amazed when I see young competitors do well at events that attract the best pilots in the world. That's got to be a humbling experience, for all involved. I had an opportunity to meet Chip Hyde when he stopped by Site 4 at the NC Regionals in September. He won the 1984 Nats pattern FAI Turnaround in Reno at age 5, but you would never know that talking to him. Nice fellow!
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 1 user thanked rclad for this useful post.
Toby W. Silhavy on 12/1/2017(UTC)
Offline Joe Layne  
#18 Posted : Friday, December 1, 2017 2:32:38 PM(UTC)
Joe Layne

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 151
United States

Thanks: 31 times
Was thanked: 65 time(s) in 36 post(s)
That was very well said Bill, I think I fill the same way, But winning one would be nice! Lol. I try to balance my RC if I practiced IMAC every week I would get burned out quickly. I like to fly helis, my little glow planes, and sometimes just go to see others at my club fly. I have enjoyed watching Greg progress into a good IMAC pilot at our club in Cincinnati. He will do well this year.
thanks 2 users thanked Joe Layne for this useful post.
rclad on 12/1/2017(UTC), Toby W. Silhavy on 12/1/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#19 Posted : Friday, December 1, 2017 4:20:16 PM(UTC)
rclad

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 153
United States

Thanks: 87 times
Was thanked: 36 time(s) in 24 post(s)
You crack me up, Joe! LOL
Chymas described our addiction as "a sickness." If that's what it is, then I don't want a cure. Joe got me into IMAC, so when my kids ask where their college funds went to, I'll just tell them, "Ask Joe." Flapper
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline Joe Layne  
#20 Posted : Friday, December 1, 2017 4:41:56 PM(UTC)
Joe Layne

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 151
United States

Thanks: 31 times
Was thanked: 65 time(s) in 36 post(s)
I have spent way to much on RC, it was money well spent. I have a twelve year old that will be in college before I know it. Well I hope she goes.Huh
Offline rclad  
#21 Posted : Friday, December 1, 2017 5:50:44 PM(UTC)
rclad

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 153
United States

Thanks: 87 times
Was thanked: 36 time(s) in 24 post(s)
There was another thread in the Pilot's Lounge titled "Who We Are." I thought that was a great idea and wish it had more profiles. I see this discussion as a kind of extension of that, so I hope more members contribute. It's hard on the flight line to get too serious when you're trying to relax between rounds, so I find the information here helpful to get to know the people we fly with at various events.

I understand IMAC is a volunteer organization and the staff at AMA is small, but it would be inspiring to see a regular column highlighting the accomplishments and hard work of the people who have made IMAC what it is today, and those who continue to reach great heights. And hopefully someone is collecting and keeping a record of the people, planes, and contests that have shaped our past and are making history today.
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 1 user thanked rclad for this useful post.
Orthobird on 12/3/2017(UTC)
Offline A.J. Jaffe  
#22 Posted : Saturday, December 2, 2017 6:24:51 PM(UTC)
A.J. Jaffe

Rank: Member

Posts: 25
United States

Thanks: 6 times
Was thanked: 11 time(s) in 6 post(s)
How much I fly really depends on the year. For the majority of my flying career I've been focused on 3D helicopters. I'm overly competitive and as such I enjoy competing and I practice a lot in order to hopefully do well at them.

I've flown IMAC for 4 seasons (inccluding this one), although the first was very late in the year
Basic 2 contests (70" extreme flight electric)
Sportsman 5 contest ( I think) I also competed at XFC in helicopters that year so up through June I was focused 97% on helis (70" electric)
Intermediate 6 contests including Nats (93" AJ Aircraft Laser electric)
Intermediate 7 contests including Nats and the Tucson Shootout (105" AJ Laser Gas/115" AJ Laser Gas (unintended upgrade from the 105 to the 115))

I can't speak as much to practice before this year, but what I was flying electric so like Greg I was doing just 2 sequences per flight. This year I switched to gas, tracked my flights, and didn't fly airplanes at all from nats (very early July) until September. I flew over 239 flights this year including contests. Between contests and practice (most practice flights are over 10-12 minutes, so I assume that I average 10 minutes a piece, so that's just under 40 hours of flight time this year (March 15 until now) From September until the beginning of November, which was practice for TAS and the worlds qualifier (and those 2 events) I flew 77 flights.

Next year will be unique for me, as I am moving up a class but more importantly to me I'm competing in the worlds, as such my contest attended number may be down ( I'm thinking 5 including worlds) but my practice time will be increased. My hope is that total in the months of July/August I will have well over 100 flights each 10+ minutes, as I am not planning to attend any contests in those 2 months just practice HARD. The other difficulty that I have is that the really good practice field(s) near me are about an hour and a half away. That makes it very hard to go practice after work, but when I do go up I try to get 8-10 flights in at a minimum. I'm lucky that I have several current and past unlimited winners that I fly with as well as a lot of pattern guys who are really helpful in terms of extra eyes to judge me and see things that I don't.

Hope this all helps.

A.J.
thanks 1 user thanked A.J. Jaffe for this useful post.
rclad on 12/2/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#23 Posted : Saturday, December 2, 2017 7:13:53 PM(UTC)
rclad

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 153
United States

Thanks: 87 times
Was thanked: 36 time(s) in 24 post(s)
Thanks, A.J. I hope your hard work pays off at the Worlds. All the best to you.

An "unintended upgrade"! That's a positive way of looking at a crash. Nice. Cool

That's a bummer about the distance you have to drive to your airfield. Makes your flying stats all the more impressive.
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline rclad  
#24 Posted : Wednesday, December 6, 2017 5:16:52 PM(UTC)
rclad

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 153
United States

Thanks: 87 times
Was thanked: 36 time(s) in 24 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Orthobird Go to Quoted Post
Well, my first year, I did not attend any contests.
I downloaded the basic sequence and practiced it at home (sim) and then at the club for a full year.
5 years ago, I attended a boot camp, and then i practiced at home the basic sequence for a year.
...
in 2017, I flew advanced, I attended 9 contests. By the end of the year, I Ended up in 1st place in regionals. I also hosted and was CD for the 3rd Annual Shreveport SHARKS club IMAC contest.
...
biggest sacrifice since doing IMAC = time away from my wife and two daughters.
2nd sacrifice is time away from Work. in 2017, my RVU went down by over 300 over a 12 month period. Oh well. There is more to life than making money all the time.

sorry for being so long winded, I love IMAC!


Thanks, Cam. This is epic! Two years of practice before your first contest?! I've been trying to fathom that and all the hard work and the sacrifices you made to achieve the success you have. Congratulations! I would love to fly at the SHARKS field some day. Looks awesome!

Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 1 user thanked rclad for this useful post.
Orthobird on 12/6/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#25 Posted : Wednesday, December 6, 2017 5:33:37 PM(UTC)
rclad

Rank: Advanced Member

Posts: 153
United States

Thanks: 87 times
Was thanked: 36 time(s) in 24 post(s)
Below are some traits of a good IMAC pilot that I have gathered from the posts above and the pilots I've met while flying IMAC this past year. I've been reflecting on this as I work on putting an IMAC Basic Primer together for next year (AirMasters in Cincinnati, July 7, 2018). I thought it might be helpful to others as well. Feel free to comment and add to it.

Traits of a Good IMAC Pilot:

• Humility
– There is always something new to learn and someone better than you from whom to learn it. Let your flying do the boasting for you.

• Good Judgement
– Safety is paramount, whether practicing alone at your home field or in front of a crowd in competition.

• Technical Competence
– Even if you have someone else build your plane, you need to know each piece of equipment on the plane and the setup on your radio, and how to adjust them if necessary at the field and in competition. Competence includes knowing the AMA safety rules, the current AMA scale aerobatics rulebook, the Aresti catalog (at a minimum the notation for your class), the dynamics of aerobatic flight, the effects of wind, weather and altitude, and the judging requirements for the class you are flying or judging.

• Ability to Think Inside the Box
– We don’t have a Box per se, but flying scale aerobatics requires the ability to think on your feet and under pressure. This is probably more important for advancing skills and pushing your limits in practice than flying in competition, since by that point your thumbs need to take over the mechanics of the maneuvers, while you focus on keeping the plane on track and in the best position for judging. The competence that comes from practice will help you remain calm when a flight does not go as planned.

• Willingness to Take Reasonable Risks
– Every flight involves some risk, and learning new skills in aerobatics requires a careful balance between increased risk and new rewards. We have to push at the boundaries of our comfort within reason, which means keeping all of the above points in mind. Your safety and the safety of others is paramount when learning new aerobatic skills. It helps to remain detached from the planes we love to fly.

• Willingness to Practice Precision
– Unless you’re born with natural talent on the sticks, improvement and new skills take time. This is a hobby, not a job, so we need to find ways to make practice fun! It always helps to picture your goal: flying that perfect track in the sky with precision, grace and style.

• Trust in Your Caller
– Behind every good pilot stands a good caller. It's critical to find a competent caller you can trust, someone who can not only read the Aresti notation, but also provide some guidance when you go off track. For extra safety, when it's a busy flight line or an Unknown, add a spotter as well

• A Good Sense of Humor
– In the end we can’t take any of this too seriously. Take a deep breath, share a joke, and learn to roll with whatever comes your way. If you’re not having fun, you’re in the wrong sport.

Edited by user Thursday, December 7, 2017 12:13:14 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Added "Trust in Your Caller"

Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 4 users thanked rclad for this useful post.
Dangerous Dan on 12/6/2017(UTC), Orthobird on 12/6/2017(UTC), Earle Andrews on 12/7/2017(UTC), Steven_R on 12/7/2017(UTC)
2 Pages<12
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Notification

Icon
Error